Land subsidence in the western states due to groundwater overdraft.

dc.acquisition-srcen_US
dc.call-noAcc# 1235en_US
dc.contract-noen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoland, J.F.en_US
dc.contributor.otherWater Resources Bulletinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T16:48:58Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T16:48:58Z
dc.date.issued1972en_US
dc.degreeen_US
dc.descriptionp. 118-131.en_US
dc.description-otheren_US
dc.description.abstractDevelopment of farm lands in most of the western states has required irrigation by surface water or groundwater, supplemental to precipitation. In areas where the supply of surface water has been small, agricultural development has been supported almost wholly by pumping from wells. As a result of the increasing demand for water, pumping draft has exceeded replenishment in many areas. Water levels have been drawn down from 100 to 500 feet, greatly increasing the grain-to-grain stress or effective overburden load on the aquifer systems in which the head depletion has occurred. This increase in stress tends to cause compaction of the deposits and correlative subsidence of the land surface (Poland and Davis, 1969). Examples of major subsidence problems are given and include Houston-Galveston, Texas.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://gbic.tamug.edu/request.htmen_US
dc.geo-codeHoustonen_US
dc.geo-codeGalveston Islanden_US
dc.historyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/18977
dc.latitudeen_US
dc.locationGBIC Collection file roomen_US
dc.longitudeen_US
dc.notesen_US
dc.placeen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries1235.00en_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.scaleen_US
dc.seriesen_US
dc.subjectsubsidenceen_US
dc.subjectground wateren_US
dc.subjectwater resourcesen_US
dc.subjectwater useen_US
dc.subjectresource useen_US
dc.subjectaquifersen_US
dc.subjectwater tableen_US
dc.titleLand subsidence in the western states due to groundwater overdraft.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.universityen_US
dc.vol-issue8(1)en_US
Files