Feeding habits of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) in Galveston Bay, Texas: Seasonal diet variation and predator-prey size relationships

dc.acquisition-srcDownloaded from-Web of Scienceen_US
dc.call-noen_US
dc.contract-noen_US
dc.contributor.authorScharf FSen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchlicht KKen_US
dc.contributor.otherEstuariesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T17:17:12Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T17:17:12Z
dc.date.issued2000 Feben_US
dc.degreeen_US
dc.description128-139en_US
dc.description-otheren_US
dc.description.abstractFeeding habits, seasonal diet variation, and predator size-prey size relationships of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) were investigated in Galveston Bay, Texas through stomach contents analysis. A total of 598 red drum ranging from 291-763 mm total length were collected and their stomach contents analyzed during fah 1997 and spring 1998. The diet of red drum showed significant seasonal patterns, and was dominated by white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus) during fall. and gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus) during spring. Blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) was an important component of red drum diets during both seasons. Significant differences existed between prey types consumed during fall and spring as red drum diet reflected seasonal variation in prey availability. Predictive regression equations were generated to estimate original carapace width of blue crabs from several measurements taken from carapace fragments recovered in red drum stomachs. Regressions were highly significant (r(2) > 0.97) and increased the number of blue crabs Kith size information nearly three fold. Predator size-prey size relationships were determined for red drum feeding on white shrimp, gulf menhaden, and blue crab. Although regression slopes were statistically significant, prey sizes increased only slightly with increasing red drum size. Comparisons of prey sizes consumed by red drum with sizes occurring in the field indicate that red drum feed in nearshore shallow water habitats, which serve as nursery areas for many juvenile fishes and crustaceans. Our findings demonstrate that red drum feed on several prey species of commercial and recreational value and may hare important effects on estuarine community structureen_US
dc.description.urihttp://gbic.tamug.edu/request.htmen_US
dc.historyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/23458
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dc.longitudeen_US
dc.notesTimes Cited: 2ArticleEnglishScharf, F. SUniv Massachusetts, Dept Nat Resources Conservat, Amherst, MA 01003 USACited References Count: 34303ZYPO BOX 368, LAWRENCE, KS 66044 USALAWRENCEen_US
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dc.relation.ispartofseries51105.00en_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.scaleen_US
dc.seriesen_US
dc.subjectLENGTH-WEIGHT RELATIONSHIPen_US
dc.subjectFOOD-HABITSen_US
dc.subjectSPOTTED SEATROUTen_US
dc.subjectPENAEUS-AZTECUSen_US
dc.subjectBROWN SHRIMPen_US
dc.subjectFLORIDAen_US
dc.subjectRECRUITMENTen_US
dc.subjectPOPULATIONSen_US
dc.subjectLOUISIANAen_US
dc.subjectGROWTHen_US
dc.titleFeeding habits of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) in Galveston Bay, Texas: Seasonal diet variation and predator-prey size relationshipsen_US
dc.typeJournalen_US
dc.universityen_US
dc.vol-issue23(1)en_US

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