A biological and geological reconnaissance of selected topographical features on the Texas continental shelf: a final report to the US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Outer Continental Shelf Office, New Orleans, Louisiana

dc.acquisition-srcDr. James Baker's Working Collectionen_US
dc.call-noGC521.T48en_US
dc.contract-no08550-CT5-4en_US
dc.contributor.authorTexas A&M Research Foundationen_US
dc.contributor.authorTexas A&M University Dept of Oceanographyen_US
dc.contributor.authorUnited States Bureau of Land Managementen_US
dc.contributor.otheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T16:47:02Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T16:47:02Z
dc.date.issued1976en_US
dc.degreeen_US
dc.description377 pgs.en_US
dc.description-otheren_US
dc.description.abstractDuring U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) public hearings held in 1973, 1974 and 1975 prior to Texas Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas lease sales, concern was expressed by the National Marine Fisheries Service, scientists from Texas A&M and the University of Texas and private citizens over the possible environmental impact of oil and gas drilling and production operations on coral reefs and fishing banks in or adjacent to lease blocks to be sold. As a result, certain restrictive regulations concerning drilling operations in the vicinity of the well documented coral reefs and biostromal communities at the East and West Flower Gardens were established by BLM, and Signal Oil Company was required to provide a biological and geological baseline study of the less well known Stetson Bank before a drilling permit could be issued. Considering the almost total lack of knowledge of the geology and biotic communities associated with the South Texas OCS banks lying in or near lease blocks to be offered for sale in 1975, BLM contracted with Texas A&M University to provide the biological and geological baseline information required to facilitate judgments as to the extent and nature of restrictive regulations on drilling near these banks which might be required to insure their protection. In pursuit of this, scientists from Texas A&M University were to direct their attention toward assessments of ground fish populations, unique biological and geological features, substratum type and distribution, and the biotic and geologic relationships between these banks and those farther north.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://gbic.tamug.edu/request.htmen_US
dc.geo-codeGulf of Mexicoen_US
dc.history2-4-09 kswen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/18672
dc.latitudeen_US
dc.locationTAMUG Circulating Collectionen_US
dc.longitudeen_US
dc.notesen_US
dc.placeCollege Station, TXen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries10198.00en_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.scaleen_US
dc.seriesen_US
dc.subjectcontinental shelfen_US
dc.subjectgeologyen_US
dc.subjectoceanographyen_US
dc.titleA biological and geological reconnaissance of selected topographical features on the Texas continental shelf: a final report to the US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Outer Continental Shelf Office, New Orleans, Louisianaen_US
dc.typeBooken_US
dc.universityen_US
dc.vol-issueen_US

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