Conflicting interests and the biological control of weeds

dc.acquisition-srcen_US
dc.call-noAcc# 9137en_US
dc.contract-noen_US
dc.contributor.authorAndres, L.A.en_US
dc.contributor.editoren_US
dc.contributor.otherProceedings V: International symposium on biological control of weeds, brisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T17:37:30Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T17:37:30Z
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.degreeen_US
dc.descriptionp. 9en_US
dc.description-otheren_US
dc.description.abstractThe inability to predict the impact of an introduced biological control agent against naturalized or native plants has stalled biological control projects against naturalized and native weeds. Lack of accurate information on economic, ecological and aesthetic loss-benefit thresholds for the plants in question, plus the absence of a forum for evaluating conflicting interests, hinders resolution. Improved methods of evaluating the potential effect of an agent on the weed and non-target plants are needed to strengthen the impact predictability of the agent.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://gbic.tamug.edu/request.htmen_US
dc.geo-codeUnited Statesen_US
dc.historyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/26231
dc.latitudeen_US
dc.locationGBIC Collectionen_US
dc.longitudeen_US
dc.notesen_US
dc.placeen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries9137.00en_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.scaleen_US
dc.seriesen_US
dc.subjecten_US
dc.titleConflicting interests and the biological control of weedsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.universityen_US
dc.vol-issueen_US

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