A habitat-use model to determine essential fish habitat for juvenile brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) in Galveston Bay, Texas

dc.acquisition-srcDownloaded from-Web of Scienceen_US
dc.call-noen_US
dc.contract-noen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorChristensen JDen_US
dc.contributor.authorMonaco MEen_US
dc.contributor.authorCaldwell PAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatthews GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMinello TJen_US
dc.contributor.otherFishery Bulletinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T17:16:51Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T17:16:51Z
dc.date.issued2004 Apren_US
dc.degreeen_US
dc.description264-277en_US
dc.description-otheren_US
dc.description.abstractA density prediction model for juvenile brown shrimp (Farfan-tepenaeus aztecus) was developed by using three bottom types, five salinity zones, and four seasons to quantify patterns of habitat use in Galveston Bay, Texas. Sixteen years of quantitative density data were used. Bottom types were vegetated marsh edge, submerged aquatic vegetation, and shallow non-vegetated bottom. Multiple regression was used to develop density estimates, and the resultant formula was then coupled with a geographical information system (GIS) to provide a spatial mosaic (map) of predicted habitat use. Results indicated that juvenile brown shrimp (<100 mm) selected vegetated habitats in salinities of 15-25 ppt and that seagrasses were selected over marsh edge where they co-occurred. Our results provide a spatially resolved estimate of high-density areas that will help designate essential fish habitat (EFH) in Galveston Bay. In addition, using this modeling technique, we were able to provide an estimate of the overall population of juvenile brown shrimp (<100 mm) in shallow water habitats within the bay of approximately 1.3 billion. Furthermore, the geographic range of the model was assessed by plotting observed (actual) versus expected (model) brown shrimp densities in three other Texas bays. Similar habitat-use patterns were observed in all three bays-each having a coefficient of determination >0.50. These results indicate that this model may have a broader geographic application and is a plausible approach in refining current EFH designations for all Gulf of Mexico estuaries with similar geomorphological and hydrological characteristicsen_US
dc.description.urihttp://gbic.tamug.edu/request.htmen_US
dc.historyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/23410
dc.latitudeen_US
dc.locationen_US
dc.longitudeen_US
dc.notesTimes Cited: 0ArticleEnglishClark, R. DNOAA, Biogeog Program, Ctr Coastal Monitoring & Assessment, Natl Ctr Coastal Ocean Sci,Natl Ocean Serv, Silver Spring, MD 20910 USACited References Count: 59817MV7600 SAND POINT WAY NE BIN C15700, SEATTLE, WA 98115 USASEATTLEen_US
dc.placeen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries51058.00en_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.scaleen_US
dc.seriesen_US
dc.subjectSALT-MARSHen_US
dc.subjectPENAEUS-AZTECUSen_US
dc.subjectDECAPOD CRUSTACEANSen_US
dc.subjectNEKTON USEen_US
dc.subjectNATANT MACROFAUNAen_US
dc.subjectESTUARINEen_US
dc.subjectEDGEen_US
dc.subjectMICROHABITATen_US
dc.subjectSETIFERUSen_US
dc.subjectSELECTIONen_US
dc.titleA habitat-use model to determine essential fish habitat for juvenile brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) in Galveston Bay, Texasen_US
dc.typeJournalen_US
dc.universityen_US
dc.vol-issue102(2)en_US
Files