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dc.contributor.authorBrunson, Julie
dc.contributor.authorvan Hengstum, Peter
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Shawna
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-14T16:59:31Z
dc.date.available2019-02-14T16:59:31Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/29763
dc.description.abstractBlueholes and sinkholes are ubiquitous in the tropics, and their sediment preserve records of environmental change. There is a poor understanding of how environments in blueholes change during Holocene sea-level rise. Quantity and type of organic matter deposited are closely related to environmental conditions at time of deposition. Three main factors likely impacting organic matter accumulation: (1) primary productivity from the water, (2) hydrographic conditions in the bluehole which impact the rate of decomposition, and (3) Holocene sea-level. How does sedimentary organic matter document paleoenvironmental change in Freshwater River Bluehole through the Holocene?en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSFen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.hasparthttps://dataverse.tdl.org/dataset.xhtml?persistentId=doi:10.18738/T8/QHLO0V
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES::Earth sciencesen_US
dc.subjectorganic matteren_US
dc.subjectsedimenten_US
dc.subjectblueholesen_US
dc.titleWhat does Holocene organic matter deposition in a Bahamian Bluehole reveal about internal basin environmental change?en_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.notesDatasets for this work are available at https://dataverse.tdl.org/dataset.xhtml?persistentId=doi:10.18738/T8/QHLO0Ven_US
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