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dc.contributor.authorWarnken KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorGill GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorSantschi PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin LLen_US
dc.contributor.otherEstuariesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T17:17:08Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T17:17:08Z
dc.date.issued2000 Octen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/23448
dc.description647-661en_US
dc.description.abstractNutrient regeneration rates were determined at three sites increasing in distance from the Trinity River, the main freshwater input source, to Galveston Bay, Texas, from 1994 through 1996. Diffusive fluxes generally agreed in direction with directly measured benthic fluxes but underestimated the exchange of nutrients across the sediment-water interface. While the fluxes of ammonium and phosphate were directed from the sediments into the overlying waters, the fluxes of silicate and chloride changed in both magnitude and direction in response to changing Trinity River flow conditions. Oxygen fluxes showed benthic production during both summer 1995 and winter 1996, while light-dark deployments showed production-consumption, respectively. Benthic inputs of nutrients were higher at either the middle or outer Trinity Bay regions, most likely due to a higher quality and quantity of the autochthonous organic matter deposited. This feature is consistent with and gives evidence for previously observed non-conservative mixing behaviors reported for nutrients in this region of Galveston Bay. Calculated turnover times, between 7 to 135 d for phosphate, 4 to 56 d for silicate, and 0.3 to 10 d for ammonium were significantly shorter than the average Trinity Bay water residence time of 1.5 yr for the period September 1995 through October 1996. During periods of decreased Trinity River now and increased residence times, benthic inputs of ammonium and phosphate were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater than Trinity River inputs and were the dominant input source of these nutrients to Trinity Bay. The sediments, a sink for silicate when overlying water column concentrations of silicate were elevated, became a source of silicate to the overlying waters of Trinity Bay under reduced flow, high salinity conditionsen_US
dc.description.urihttp://gbic.tamug.edu/request.htmen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries51096.00en_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.subjectSEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACEen_US
dc.subjectCONTINENTAL-SHELFen_US
dc.subjectNARRAGANSETT BAYen_US
dc.subjectRIVER ESTUARYen_US
dc.subjectFLUXESen_US
dc.subjectDIFFUSIONen_US
dc.subjectSEAen_US
dc.subjectDISTRIBUTIONSen_US
dc.subjectREGENERATIONen_US
dc.subjectTRANSPORTen_US
dc.titleBenthic exchange of nutrients in Galveston Bay, Texasen_US
dc.typeJournalen_US
dc.placeen_US
dc.seriesen_US
dc.vol-issue23(5)en_US
dc.locationen_US
dc.scaleen_US
dc.latitudeen_US
dc.longitudeen_US
dc.contract-noen_US
dc.notesTimes Cited: 8ArticleEnglishWarnken, K. WTexas A&M Univ, Dept Oceanog, Lab Oceanog & Environm Res, 507 Ave U, Galveston, TX 77551 USACited References Count: 43383QHPO BOX 368, LAWRENCE, KS 66044 USALAWRENCEen_US
dc.degreeen_US
dc.acquisition-srcDownloaded from-Web of Scienceen_US
dc.description-otheren_US
dc.universityen_US
dc.historyen_US
dc.call-noen_US


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